Carnegie Mellon University Department of Chemistry
photo of Paul Karol

Paul J. Karol

Professor Emeritus

Carnegie Mellon University

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Faculty & Research

Paul J. Karol

Professor Emeritus

Research Areas

Nuclear Chemistry, ultrarelativistic cosmic rays, radioactive waste disposal

Modeling of high-energy nuclear reactions focusing on two applilcations: (i) ultrarelativistic cosmic rays believed to be from outside the galaxy and with energies >10,000 EeV and abundances higher than can be understood from cosmology and particle physics fundamentals, and (ii) permanent disposal of radioactive fission product waste from the (re-emerging and global) nuclear power industry employing transmutation in high-energy, high-intensity accelerator systems.

Education and Appointments
2008 Chair, ACS Committee on Nomenclature, Terminology and Symbols
2007 Chair, IUPAC/IUPAP 3rd Joint Working Party on the Discovery of New Elements
2003 Chair, IUPAC/IUPAP 2nd Joint Working Party on the Discovery of New Elements
2000 Visiting Professor, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai
1999 Chair, IUPAC/IUPAP 1st Joint Working Party on the Discovery of New Elements
1996 Chair, ACS Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology
1996 Chair, IUPAC Commission on Radiochemistry and Nuclear Techniques
1995 Professor of Chemistry, Carnegie Mellon University
1991 Visiting Scientist, Institute of Nuclear Physics, Legnaro, Italy
1981-6 Associate Dean, Mellon College of Science
1974 Associate Professor of Chemistry
1969 Assistant Professor of Chemistry
1967 Postdoctoral Research Associate, Brookhaven National Laboratory
Awards and Distinctions
2008 The Richard Moore Award, Mellon College of Science
1979 Mellon Institute of Science Teaching Award
Selected Publications

R. C. Barber, P. J. Karol, H. Nakahara, E. Vardaci and E. Vogt, “Discovery of the Elements with Atomic Number ≥ 113”, Pure Appl. Chem. (accepted 2010, in revision)

R. C. Barber, H. Gäggeler, P. J. Karol, H. Nakahara, E. Vardaci and E. Vogt, “Discovery of the Element with Atomic Number 112”, Pure Appl. Chem. 81, 1331 (2009)

P. J. Karol, H. Nakahara, B. W. Petley and E. Vogt, “On the Claims for Discovery of Elements 110, 111, 112, 114, 116, and 118”, Pure Appl. Chem. 75, 1601 (2003)

P. J. Karol, “The Mendeleev-Seaborg Periodic Table: Through Z = 1138 and Beyond”, J. Chem. Educ. 79, 60 (2002)

D. A. Holder, B. G. Johnson, and P. J. Karol, “A Consistent Set of Oxidation Number Rules for Intelligent Computer Programming”, J. Chem. Educ. 79, 465 (2002)

P. J. Karol, H. Nakahara, B. W. Petley and E. Vogt, “On the Discovery of the Elements 110-112”, Pure Appl. Chem. 73, 959 (2001)